soleus muscle pain

I posted about this a long time ago, but it is prevalent again. The soleus muscles (your other calf muscle that's right below the ball of your calf) on my legs are killing me. They were a pain for me back in october/november when I was up to six miles of running. So much so, that I quit running altogether until yesterday. Now I'm essentially starting over and the pain is already back. I have to figure out what's going on because it hurts and I want to run. Anyone have any advice on how to cure this problem?

Comments

  • Ice, stretching, pain meds, wobble board, and taking it slowly. Since you quit running you're starting at square 2 (not one since you're accustomed to your VFFs  ;)).

    My wobble board comes in on Friday!  ;D
  • what is a wobble board hawkeye?
  • on 1266978303:

    what is a wobble board hawkeye?


    Also known as a balance board, it's essentially a board that has half a sphere attached to the bottom on which you balance on. It's been mentioned a few times on the boards. It's supposed to help develop lower leg and foot muscles and improve balance etc. I got mine on amazon.com for about $70 with free shipping. It's 16" in diameter and adjustable to 3 heights/difficulties.
  • interesting. I don't have the cash for that right now, but i'm at least going to pick up a rolling pin like i've been hearing about
  • on 1266982080:

    interesting. I don't have the cash for that right now, but i'm at least going to pick up a rolling pin like i've been hearing about


    A $5 rolling pin (chef mate brand) from target does wonders on sore muscles and easier and cheaper to use than a foam roller imo.

    A wobble board just helps build muscles and doesn't treat immediate pain like a rolling pin.
  • i may head there tomorrow!
  • I got a wobble board on the recommendation of Marley when I was rehabbing my ankle.  It definitely helps the ankles and lower legs.  I think you can find them for as low as $30-$40 depending on brand and the particular sports store (mine was $40.00 as the local MC sports).  I think Walmart might even carry something similar.
  • Oh yeah, there are definately cheaper boards out there. You can probably get them for $20 on amazon and $30 in stores.

    I wanted a board that would last me a long time and would grow to fit my needs, hence the birch construction and 3 levels of tilt. A lot of the cheaper boards are made of plastic (not always a bad thing) and only have one or perhaps 2 levels of tilt. Some also have "flat" spots and balance too easily. I didn't want to buy another board when I "outgrew" the cheap one, so I spent a little more money for something that would be more economical and useful in the long run.
  • on 1266958881:

    I posted about this a long time ago, but it is prevalent again. The soleus muscles (your other calf muscle that's right below the ball of your calf) on my legs are killing me. They were a pain for me back in october/november when I was up to six miles of running. So much so, that I quit running altogether until yesterday. Now I'm essentially starting over and the pain is already back. I have to figure out what's going on because it hurts and I want to run. Anyone have any advice on how to cure this problem?


    If you’re not getting enough protein in your diet to support muscle recovery, then you could be driving that muscle into deterioration. Once I recovered from wearing “normal” running shoes, I ended up running longer and more often in my VFFs. I was on a pretty high carb diet at the time. As soon as I hit the 25 – 30 miles per week mark I became plagued with prolonged muscle fatigue and pain in the calves. Once I added in an additional 35 – 45 grams of protein all was good again.

    A thing to think about is if you are past the beginning calf soreness of converting to VFFs, then you should not experience it again unless you have a long layoff. If you are able to run 3 miles twice or three times a week without calf soreness, then it’s not a muscle conditioning issue. It is probably a recovery problem which might require more protein. I shoot for ½ gram of protein for every pound of body weight. I normally get 30 – 40 grams in my daily food, but add a protein shake for another 45 grams. Total of ~ 75 - 85 grams a day keeps the fatigue away.

    Rgs, Jeepman
  • thanks jeep. I don't think that's my issue, but i'll look into it. I usually eat plenty of meat so I never would imagine protein would be my issue.
  • so I got the pin. How exactly is the best way to use it?
  • on 1267071855:

    so I got the pin. How exactly is the best way to use it?


    This first video should show you how to use a foam roller, which is similar to how you should use the pin.  I personally opted for a short PVC pipe from home depot.  But a rolling pin should work.  Chances are though, that it is too small a diameter to roll on for a first time user, as it will be too painful.  You can try it if you want.  But you can do the rolling with the pin, using your hands.  That should provide some of the benefit.  But eventually you're going to want to move up to rolling on it like the video shows.  While the video shows the IT band, you can probably find other videos that show other stuff.  And the 2nd video is a good all around leg health video.

    How to Stretch Your IT Band and Glutes

    http://www.facebook.com/video/video.php?v=94729768994#w500-h281
  • I'm even more ghetto than a homemade wobble board; I just set my laptop on my dresser (a little above waist height) and balance on one foot, switching every foot minutes. I feel like I'm doing a workout without leaving my room.
  • Yea! My wobble board got here a day early. I'm super happy with it except that the top is a bit slippery. I can feel it working my leg muscles even after a short time on the board.
  • Orthofeet’s were recommended to me by a family member. I was happy to find a wide selection of shoe choices and colors. I eventually settled on a walking shoe. I was expecting a "break-in" period but I was happy that, after about an hour, the shoes felt good on my feet. When I wear these walking shoes, I experience no heal pain whatsoever. I can highly recommend these shoes to anyone that suffers with plantar fasciitis!
  • Orthofeet's were prescribed to me by a relative. I was cheerful to locate a wide choice of shoe decisions and hues. I inevitably settled on a mobile shoe. I was expecting a "break-in" period however I was upbeat that, after around 60 minutes, the shoes felt great on my feet. When I wear these strolling shoes, I encounter no recuperate torment at all. I can exceedingly prescribe these shoes to anybody that endures with plantar fasciitis!
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